National Mentoring Month

 

Think back to your youth. What were your favorite experiences? Better yet, who did you share them with? Imagine where you would be without the guidance of that teacher, friend or loved one who helped show you the way. Volunteering as a mentor is a valuable step in connecting youth to social and economic opportunity, and through their success strengthen families, schools, businesses and communities. Be someone who matters to someone who matters today!

Become a Mentor

Enter your zip code and browse the search results to learn more how you can make a difference and be someone who matters in a young person's life. The mentoring zip code search engine connects more than 60,000 people annually to local mentoring opportunities with more than 5,000 programs. It is the only national database for mentoring.

 

Donate to MENTOR

 

You can help support National Mentoring Month and close this mentoring gap by making a donation. Mentors positively impact youth outcomes in school, life and ultimately work – making our economy and our communities stronger. Yet one out of every three young people in the U.S. will grow up without a mentor.

DONATE

 

National Mentoring Month Campaign Materials

Show your support of mentoring and National Mentoring Month by utilizing the digital materials and toolkits available to individuals, mentoring programs and corporate partners. You can also get involved by saving the date for one of our National Mentoring Month days of service or connecting with a local campaign partner. You can view all campaign materials, PSA’s and more on the National Mentoring Month website. And if you’re active on social media? Promote National Mentoring Month using the hashtags #NationalMentoringMonth, #MentoringWorks, #MentoringEffect and #SomeoneWhoMatters.

Created in 2002 by MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership and the Harvard School of Public Health, National Mentoring Month in January focuses national attention on the need for mentors, as well as how each of us—individuals, businesses, government agencies, schools, faith communities and nonprofits—can work together to increase the number of mentors to assure positive outcomes for our young people.